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Identification

Field Value

Title

Fauna Key Habitats for Nandewar

Abstract

The key habitats have been identified at a regional scale as the most important extant vertebrate fauna habitats in Nandewar. They are derived from (i) most of the largest habitat remnants remaining in the region and (ii); smaller remnants representing areas of relatively high fertility or important vegetation types which are now largely cleared.

Resource locator

Data Quality Statement

Name: Data Quality Statement

Protocol: WWW:DOWNLOAD-1.0-http--download

Description:

Data quality statement for Fauna Key Habitats for Nandewar

Function: download

NENSW KeyHabitats ClimateChangeCorridors

Name: NENSW KeyHabitats ClimateChangeCorridors

Protocol: WWW:DOWNLOAD-1.0-http--download

Function: download

NSW WESTERN REGIONAL ASSESSMENTS – NANDEWAR

Name: NSW WESTERN REGIONAL ASSESSMENTS – NANDEWAR

Protocol: WWW:DOWNLOAD-1.0-http--download

Description:

This report summarises the outcomes of projects undertaken for the Resource and Conservation Assessment Council (RACAC)1 as part of the regional assessments of western New South Wales. These projects were undertaken within the Nandewar Bioregion.

Function: download

Unique resource identifier

Code

703dc111-8426-41ba-8000-65a7ca029ef6

Presentation form

mapDigital

Edition

Version1

Dataset language

eng

Metadata standard

Name

ANZLIC Metadata Profile: An Australian/New Zealand Profile of AS/NZS ISO 19115:2005, Geographic information - Metadata

Version

1.1

Dataset URI

https://datasets.seed.nsw.gov.au/dataset/703dc111-8426-41ba-8000-65a7ca029ef6

Purpose

Conservation assessment

Status

completed

Spatial representation

Type

vector

Geometric Object Type

surface

Geometric Object Count

1

Spatial reference system

Authority code

GDA94 Geographic (Lat\Long)

Code identifying the spatial reference system

4283

Spatial resolution

25 m

Additional information source

Nandewar corridors; North-east NSW key habitats; Nandewar WRA vegetation

Classification of spatial data and services

Field Value

Topic category

Biota

Keywords

Field Value

Keyword set

keyword value

ECOLOGY

FAUNA-Vertebrates

FAUNA

ECOLOGY-Habitat

Originating controlled vocabulary

Title

ANZLIC Search Words

Reference date

2008-05-16

Geographic location

West bounding longitude

149.929088

East bounding longitude

151.791402

North bounding latitude

-31.886245

South bounding latitude

-28.634794

Vertical extent information

Minimum value

-100

Maximum value

2228

Coordinate reference system

Authority code

urn:ogc:def:cs:EPSG::

Code identifying the coordinate reference system

5711

Temporal extent

Begin position

2004-01-01

End position

N/A

Dataset reference date

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Date type

publication

Effective date

2004-09-01

Resource maintenance

Maintenance and update frequency

notPlanned

Date of next update

2010-01-10

Contact info

Organisation name

Department of Planning, Industry and Environment

Full postal address

PO Box A290

Sydney South

NSW

1232

Australia

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Telephone number

131555

Facsimile number

02 9995 5999

Email address

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Responsible party role

pointOfContact

Quality and validity

Field Value

Lineage

1) The distribution of threatened vertebrate fauna, aerial photograph interpretation and vegetation mapping was used as the basis for delineating key habitats.

Data Set Source: Interpretation from Land and Property Information (LPI) 1:25 000 and 1:50,000 colour photographs. The dataset was developed as part of the Nandewar WRA vegetation project and the DIPNR Statewide Vegetation Mapping Project. Interpretation was conventional, with polygon development based on homogenous overstorey patterns discernible on the aerial photograph. Polygon linework was ascribed directly to clear acetate overlays. Each polygon was coded uniquely and the attributes were recorded on a separate data sheet.

Additional Processing Steps: Linework scanned to JPEG image format and rectified. Images were vectorised in Arcview Spatial analyst. Raw linework was edited and polygons built using ArcView (Edit tools v2) and Arc/Info 8.3. Attribution of polygons using Arcview and MS Access. Final validation of data using Arcview.

2) Large key habitats were initially identified as those inter-connected polygons with a canopy cover of greater than 20% which in total comprised an area greater than 1,000 ha. This area was considered sufficient to support core habitat of species with large home ranges such as the barking owl. These areas were then reviewed by experts in the fauna of the region. Since two-thirds of the vegetation of the region has been cleared, most large forest blocks were included as key habitats. Some were excluded on the basis that their shape was too fragmented for them to act as consolidated habitat.

3) Small key habitats were identified as remnant patches greater than 50ha and exhibiting one or more of the following criteria:

  • Occurrence on fertile soils. This was estimated using a combination of geology and terrain as a surrogate for soil fertility. Fertile areas were defined as the most fertile 20% of the region, which has been over 90% cleared.
  • Patches of grassy white box, yellow box or grey box were included as these box woodlands were likely to have been a major habitat of the historic Nandewar landscape. Although now largely cleared, the remaining patches are still of considerable value.
  • Mugga ironbark was included as it is a major nectar-producing and hollow-forming species recognised as important for vertebrate fauna. Although likely to have been historically less widespread than the grassy box communities, and has also been heavily cleared, it remains an important resource.
  • River red gum, which is also important for nectar and hollows and is a key component of riparian habitat on fertile soils. Most of this habitat has also been cleared or highly degraded.
  • Dry rainforest and semi-evergreen vine thicket is included as it is a rare habitat and a number of vertebrates appear to be loosely associated with dry rainforest vegetation elements.

4) The key habitats were reviewed by experts in the fauna of the region using the fauna survey results of the five-year Nandewar survey program conducted by the Department of Environment and Conservation. Remnants known to be important from the field surveys were added and others removed.

5) A final check was undertaken, primarily using Landsat imagery, particularly concentrating on the shape and condition of the patches identified.

6) Key habitat sub-regions were identified. These are areas of similar biophysical characteristics (geology, climate, terrain, vegetation and spatial location). For each of the 15 sub-regions, the threatened species known to occur, likely to occur and potentially occurring have been tabulated from survey data, Atlas of NSW Wildlife data and expert knowledge. The species lists are indicative only. For any particular key habitat they are a guide that must be used in conjunction with a consideration of local habitat characteristics.

Positional accuracy:

Accurate to the limits of the API.

For the API, horizontal linework accuracy is estimated to be within 37.5 metres for mapping from 1:25 000 aerial photos.

The mapped API boundaries were ortho-rectified. Ground Control Points (GCP's) were referenced from 1:25 000 digital topographic maps. LPI's 25m DEM was utilised for terrain adjustment and subsequently any vertical accuracy measure should be commensurate with DEM accuracy. Each orthorectified photo/overlay was verified against a Level 10 orthorectifed Landsat TM image and matched if a consistent spatial shift across the overlay/photo was encountered. Both the 20m resolution multispectral and 10m resolution panchromatic bands were used for assessing spatial shift.

Fauna record accuracy for the majority of species was restricted to those records accurate to 100m. For a number of rare species, records accurate to 1km were used.

Attribute Accuracy:

The accuracy of attributing vegetation communities is between 80-97% within the extent of existing vegetation, indicating that on at least 4 of 5 occasions, a vegetation type on the ground will be consistent with the model (on the basis of canopy floristics).

There has been no formal scientific assessment of the accuracy of attributing a vegetation remnant as key habitat. From experience in the region, it is highly likely that the larger key habitats will be important for many species due to the loss of native vegetation in the bioregion, and that small remnants of critically depleted habitat are also important, particularly for future habitat restoration. However, there is an inherent variability between species in predicting their use of habitat in different areas and considerable additional survey work would need to be carried out for a more rigorous accuracy assessment.

Logical Consistency:

The data layer has been checked (and modified where necessary) against contextual background layers such a Landsat images and fertility layers.

Completeness:

The dataset is complete for the study area.

Constraints related to access and use

Field Value

Constraint set

Use constraints

This data is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 Attribute 'Department of Planning, Industry and Environment ' in publications using this data.

Limitations on public access

Data Quality

Field Value

Scope

dataset

Completeness Commission

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

Completeness Ommission

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

Conceptual Consistency

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

Topological Consistency

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

Absolute External Positional Accuracy

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

Non Quantitative Attribute Accuracy

Date type

creation

Effective date

2004-09-01

Explanation

The accuracy of attributing vegetation communities is between 80-97% within the extent of existing vegetation, indicating that on at least 4 of 5 occasions, a vegetation type on the ground will be consistent with the model (on the basis of canopy floristics).

There has been no formal scientific assessment of the accuracy of attributing a vegetation remnant as key habitat. From experience in the region, it is highly likely that the larger key habitats will be important for many species due to the loss of native vegetation in the bioregion, and that small remnants of critically depleted habitat are also important, particularly for future habitat restoration. However, there is an inherent variability between species in predicting their use of habitat in different areas and considerable additional survey work would need to be carried out for a more rigorous accuracy assessment.

Responsible organisations

Field Value

Responsible party

Contact position

Data Broker

Organisation name

Department of Planning, Industry and Environment

Full postal address

PO Box A290

Sydney South

NSW

1232

Australia

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Telephone number

131555

Facsimile number

02 9995 5999

Email address

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Web address

http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/

Responsible party role

pointOfContact

Metadata on metadata

Field Value

Metadata point of contact

Contact position

Data Broker

Organisation name

Department of Planning, Industry and Environment

Full postal address

PO Box A290

Sydney South

NSW

1232

Australia

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Telephone number

131555

Facsimile number

02 9995 5999

Email address

data.broker@environment.nsw.gov.au

Responsible party role

distributor

Metadata date

2004-09-01

Metadata language

eng